Tag Archive: job loss


At the time and with more unabated oil in Gulf of Mexico [these modern-day oil barons “have gotten away with too much for too long” a colleague told me yesterday]; a future “ocean” without fish, edible or otherwise, long time air pollution which led to changes in our climates; too many gadgets and devices leading to  less sleep and increased distraction (especially while driving our vehicles – people who “text” while driving are road hazards no matter how “good” you think you are) and slower reactions to what is basic and true to our interpersonal relationships and species as a whole.   All of this makes me want to write traditional letters on PAPER even more and opt out of Facebook (it is useless, ISFAICS).  I still value my LAND line more that the mobile celly device. We were a better ilk without all of this “instant communication” and until we can scramble and unscramble our bodily molecules in order to transport ourselves aka the Star Trek “transporter room”, I’m feeling it all less and less.

Human technology enthusiasts and inventors are increasingly advancing the Robots and machines who will make Man obsolete by the next century at this rate. Convenience is ONE thing, Big Brother intrusion is totally another.  “Sheepole” is a phrase I read the other day on The Scholarly Kitchen’s blog comment page, 17

and describes those among us who just follow blindly every trend, fad or gadget like the zombies in “Night Of The Living Dead”.  “A ‘fembot’ might be nice,” I think to myself on these lonely bachelor nights, “but I worry that ‘it’s’ robotic vagina might short-circuit and trap my real penis in a love-lock that I might have to call the electronic EMS to embarrassingly extricate my chewed member from!”

I’m glad I didn’t become the classroom teacher I thought I’d be while in college, because I’d want to punch a kid’s lights out if another cell phone went off while I’m trying to articulate the cleverness of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.  Yes I’ve heard all the arguments by (especially) mothers who now can keep in  constant contact with their young-uns, but I always come back the “one” : didn’t my generation and those prior to survive without an electronic leash pressed to the ear?  I offer that we became more independent and stronger for the lack thereof as well – but nobody wants to hear that, it is all about convenience, convenience, convenience!!  And these modern parents still  worry about them just as much if not  more because of the play-by-play factor, so what is the advantage? Arrggh!  In yester-year, some things were better left to play themselves out unbeknownst to our parents when we got home.  C’mon, I know you can “testify!”

I am increasingly having that “this the beginning of the end of the world” conversation with people.  Have you had it?  If not, well I am glad you stopped-by for a wake-up call as at the rate things are desintegrating both naturally and having been advanced by “man”, I doubt things will be tolerable for Human Beings one-hundred years from now, few real people outside of government and chilly corporations will have jobs, making me glad I will not be around for the torture – I  already am allergic to enough stuff as it IS!  I could continue, but not now; why beat a dead transistor…or circuit board…or whatever they used yesterday before it became obsolete and  smaller today, to death?

 pickhitt: Relationships are still better enhanced by telephone communication rather than emails whether the distance is short or long; I will admit that Skype makes me feel like one of The Jetsons and is a great “next best thing to being there” innovation. D-Uh??

That is the question kids will be asking their elders soon if they aren’t already.  Terrestrial commercial radio as we once knew it IS dead. The mean-spirited “no fun bunch” has taken over. Corporations are to blame, and the Congress that deregulated radio about twenty years ago a la what Reagan did to the Air Traffic Controllers union in 1980 is also. I used to dream of being a successful music radio Program Director in a big city when I landed my first on-air gig back in 1978.  Now I know that dream will never be realized after almost forty years in the business – now mostly relegated to “part-time” status, I’m sad to say.

Recently, one of my favorite FCC Commissioners Michael Copps commented, “a tsunami of media consolidation fueled by the same hyper-speculation that was fueling so many bubbles in so many other industries [where] Stations were gobbled up en masse and totally unrealistic expectations were visited upon both them and even upon the ones who managed to stay unconsolidated.” And furthermore he said at the workshop, “the FCC had fallen “fell under the spell of an ideological deregulatory mind-set that fueled the evisceration or outright elimination of just about every public interest obligation or public interest guideline we had.” Not to mention planned careers like mine.  You can read the Commissioner’s complete remarks at  FCC.gov.

I had a job interview with a Program Director a few weeks ago.  I guess he is close to my age but younger because we both reminisced about the days of editing audio using celluloid tape and a razor blade on those big ten-inch reel-to-reel tape recorders.  When I left I wondered how he got his job? Not that he isn’t qualified or anything like that, but I’ve almost forty years in “da bizness”, and can’t even get a sniff to fulfill my career dream?  I must have missed something along the way.  All of this began to change around seventeen years ago – about the time the computer became commonplace.  The bean counters came  in over we who had gone to school for/trained in broadcasting. Suddenly we had too many desk jockeys and not enough true disc jockeys.  I remember when I always had an eye to the “trades” Help Wanted sections for that next desired location, air shift or a music director gig.  I could send a tape, CD  and resume and get hired – seeing America the raido way; stations would even help you move !  Not no more – I’m stuck at the scene of my last relocation eight years ago.  No more “Radio Ga Ga” ( a song long before Lady Ga Ga burst onto the scene, by the way).

The result is the current vast, cold and cookie-cutter non-creative radio wasteland that discourages a disc jockey’s individualism, and where every genre’s playlist is a replica of the “competing” station over at the next corporation.

Of course another big competitor for radio ears are the I-Pods, Podcasts and other virtual media which I can only wish were never invented pertaining to the number of traditional radio employment opportunities; a no-win situation.  Here is a link to a friend and former co-worker speaking upon her being let go fromWBLS FM where she helped me get my audition tape to then Program Director, Frankie Crocker:

2008-12-01_on_the_radio_it_wasnt_the_best_year_for_.html

Upon my recent prevailing against another unjust firing (when will I ever learn to get out of “radio”) a mentor wrote to me, “”Congrats!  I’m glad you won and yours is a victory for everyone who has been made a victim by companies such as Citadel.  I hope you get a generous settlement and I’m glad you didn’t let them get away with it.”

“The radio jobs that [we] yearned for thirty years ago aren’t coming back,” a Program Director friend of mine commented to me last week.  He has been one of the fortunate few to have been in his chair for about twenty years!  My suggestion has long been to bring back the requirement that broadcasters (yes,even DJs) have to pass the minimum Third Class FCC license test.  There are three classes of FCC licenses.  You would have a better quality of true communicators, and it would weed-out much of the “junk” we currently have over the terrestrial airwaves.  I bet people like Rush Limbaugh couldn’t pass the test for one on the first try! LOL

Two of  of these major “evil empires” of radio are Clear Channel (the former AM/FM radio and the greediest) and  Citadel Broadcasting.  Everytime I read a headline like this week’s “Clear Channel Revenue Slips 6% In Q4 ’09” I am happy. I hope one day they disintergrate.  Citadel has recently filed bankruptcy, so logically they should not be appealing any worker’s mysterious, curious and cost-cutting dismissals these days – except that they too live in the illogical world of the bottom financial line which dictates that they shouldn’t pay a worker who is partially unemployed and pay into his/her unemployment benefits; yet they would rather dismiss that type of employee rather than create a position where he or she could earn more and get out from under the Unemployment safety net. I was a victim of such a bean counter lady recently.  There is no respect for longevity anymore and no willingness to “work with” employees for mutual benefits.  My uncle, who just passed away at ninety-two years old was a Jazz fan – he loved WBGO and NPR’s programs – always said, “The larger the company, the more stupid rules.”  ‘Nuff said.

We used to lightheartedly say about our being in radio that we were “bitten by the bug” because we had the fever to play music, cut-up, entertain, inform and communicate the truths about our times.  That bug led to a fever that is hard to cure, and if you can break it, the residue tastes like that of losing a long-time lover or breaking a drug habit.

pickhitt: an optimistic perspective on the future of traditional radio DJs (at least in the UK) is here:

traditional-djs-survive-internet-radio-revolution?CMP=twt_gu

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