Category: Book reviews


If you are an Achilliad frequent-flyer, you know I was an English/Communications (double) Major at the university and that I review or report on books I read, from time-to-time. Its much more pleasurable to read for fun and information than for a grade, by the way! So this season, I have a new reason to try a different angle: letting you VIPs see what is on my bedside bookshelf reading list this summer!

I don’t promise to review or report on all of these, but in any event, they caught my eyes at the library long enough to bring home for a closer look!

Of particular note is “A Boob’s Life”, by Leslie Lehr, which hooked me – maybe because I’m a “breast man” – long enough to tap into my curiosity about how women really feel (no pun intended) about their titties. I am into it already and the author seems kind of angry with historic purpose.

The other hottie at my bedside is Daniel James Brown’s “Facing The Mountain”, which is about the mistreatment of Japanese Americans in the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack on us during World War II. Fascinatingly relevant on so many levels to our American circumstances even here in the summer of 2021.

“Little Fires Everywhere”, by Celeste Ng, is a novel that just cannot seem to snag my attention long enough to finish – it drags a bit, despite excellent reviews when it came out. I want to see it through, but may have to purchase it if I run out of library renews.

On the historical tip is Ronald C. White’s “Lincoln In Private”, which are the written etchings of the man who many hold up as our greatest American President, Abraham Lincoln. It is a kind of “behind-the-scenes” look at the notes he wrote in-between crafting and delivering his lectures and speeches about the issues during his times; some of it resonates to our collective current calamities.

So that’s IT! As the public service announcement used to say, “Reading Is FUNdamental!”Have a good reading summer, wherever your travels take you, and maybe we can compare notes and opinions in the Autumn.

During an interview published in  the January 2020 issue of AARP Magazine, Academy Award-winning actress Viola Davis was asked if she talks to her 10-year-old daughter about the differences between their childhoods. She ended her thoughtful answer with, “And I’m not trying to say that I’m making her grow up passive or milquetoast. But empathy is in short supply today.”  Empathy; one of the many important bases that veteran CBS news reporter and anchorman, Dan Rather, along with Emmy Award winning filmmaker and journalist, Elliot Kirshner touch in their very timely book,  What Unites Us: Reflections On Patriotism (Algonquin $22.95 9781616207823).  This book came out in 2017, but it could have been written in the aftermath of the January 6, 2021 insurrection riot on our Capitol, encouraged by “you-know-who”.

Shining a mirror upon us and our democracy’s nervous times, these reflections are like a Social Studies class refresher course (especially if you went to public school  in a major market, prior to the 1990s). It is where memoir meets history book.

Back in my television watching days, I always made time to tune into Mr. Rather anchoring the CBS Evening News broadcast when I could.  He was the logical successor to Walter Cronkite and ranks among my favorite anchors with Chet Hutley & David Brinkley, Douglas Edwards, Tom Brokaw, Peter Jennings, Max Robinson and Connie Chung.

The gentlemen take us on a cautionary journey, with his early 20th century rural Houston, Texas roots the backdrop against which he reminds and teaches how our country, The United States of America has been better; falters and then steps back up when non-partisanship prevails, cementing all of us together, against many odds. I loved when he challenged some who conveniently try to say they are more “patriotic” than others.

I found the chapter, “Steady”, most enlightening.  Especially page 259, where he writes about the Korean War and its effect upon our country, to be the most enlightening and insightful because that is the conflict which is rarely talked about and which was not addressed in-depth during my school days. Maybe because I was to young to have experienced it in real time, in college by the time it was written about in text books and because I had a real close uncle who served there.

At times it seems that he is speaking directly to the 45th “President” and his ilk without naming names, not harping upon them, but giving equal thought to both ends of the political and philosophical spectrum as only a well-traveled professional broadcaster and news reporter can.  His reporting, and that of his colleagues was never “fake”, as some of the privileged characters who he alludes to would have us believe.

If ever our country needed a dose of true history and togetherness encouragement from one of its citizens, it is now.  Rather’s book should be required educational reading across the land in public, voucher, charter and parochial schools (all of which he writes about); churches, cafeterias, coffee shops, colleges and private clubs (with discussions to follow)!  My rating is five-out-of-five American flags.  

This is the autobiographical memoir story of the first half of a life whose backdrop lays bare a dysfunctional family environment which she could not jettison as she grew older, only to rise above all, to superstardom; of talent and belief in self over drama.

I never cared whether Mariah Carey was Caucasian or just a light-skinned black American; in-fact, I figured she was “mixed” the first time I held one of her records in my hot DJ hands, without a second thought – obviously she wrestled with it.  Candid and insightful, Mariah and Michaela Angela Davis write a mix of slang and sesquipedalian words, in The Meaning Of Mariah Carey (Andy Cohen/Henry Holt, $29.99 978125016468), and I must admit that the co-author’s name threw me a bit, being a fan of the activist, philosopher, former Black Panther and professor with a similar moniker.

In describing her life in four parts, she amazingly defies poor decisions to thrive on the world’s greatest musical stages!

Making questionable decisions with some men, which were not in the ilk of her Army veteran father, who she loved, but did not strive to stay with and emulate, her descriptions of affairs saddened me.  I liked how she injected her  various song lyrics into the chapters and you will notice increasing mentions of God as her storied read progresses.

Also, I learned that her father’s trademark linguine dish is also one of my favorites to make!

As a music radio disc jockey at the height of my career during her Tommy Mottola marriage period, knowing what I’d heard about him, I always found it troublesome and curious as to why she married him!  It led to her post-Mottola “melt down”, which she totally could have avoided, in my opinion.  Maybe I like her less as a person – but more than many who I mention her to – as a result of the revelations here, but still will always enjoy her music. She mentions “radio” often and its a wonder our paths never crossed! Maybe cause I’m such a fan (“lamb” as she calls us) and was in that same music business on the radio DJ side during her times of struggle – part of my 40 years on the air – that its so difficult to read about the family hand she was dealt and her not understanding that her mother was emotionally conflicted.  Then when she “made it” was surprised they would try to soak her for endless “loans”, which would never be repaid. Not a totally unfamiliar scenario, but Ms. Carey seemed not to see it coming. Fortunately, her music saved her life.

Unfortunately, the story, with its great middle photo-album section, never speaks about her having higher education, like college, which may have trained her mind to recognize those who would try to use her fame to their advantage. Yes, the recording studio was her solace, as she kept trying to believe, even seeking a therapist, that family would change; they seldom DO.

Mariah also wrote this tome to set the record straight about how she became “the high-priced spread”, to push back against what the tabloid press puts out there about her life and struggles, “In her own words”, as the cliché goes.  I’m surprised she doesn’t mention the great Smokey Robinson in her “Few Words About Great Men” chapter, where she clearly adores fellow Motown hall of famer, Stevie Wonder’s lyrical musicianship and writing genius; I’d love to hear a Smokey & Mariah duet!

I kept this book on my bedside night table and read a chapter per night, since I saw it in the “Bestsellers” section at my local public library; Covid-19 library closures allowed me to keep the volume longer, and so, Mimi got into my dreams a few times – I guess I was concerned about her! For me, ‘the meaning of Mariah Carey’ is, “its in the Mix.”  I recommend this book for both Lambs (her fans) and casual popular music lovers alike, with five stars.


In The Watergate Girl, My Fight for Truth and Justice Against a Criminal President
[Henry Holt & Co. $28, 9781250244321], Jill Wine-Banks combines vignettes from her inspirational and touching personal memoir with her work as the first Washington, D.C female Assistant Prosecutor, which happened to be during the Watergate Scandal, helping to develop the case against President Richard Nixon and his associates in the early 1970s, into an exciting read.

You’ll not want to put this book down (even though I did so, in order to sleep), as it may remind you of the immorality of the current White House (page 141).

Over 47 years ago, Ms. Wine (as she was known as at that time) dutifully made her way, with educational skills and class without sass, up the sexist boy’s club legal ladder, ultimately to become General Counsel of the US Army during the Carter Administration; but on the way, became an assistant Watergate prosecutor. This refreshing page-turner is far from all dry legalese, as plenty personal spice and feminine reality becomes the mortar between the jurisprudence.

I couldn’t help but compare her description to the current group of “plumbers” , thugs and the GOP criminal wannabees (Senate Majority leader), who are against most of our open society citizens and hell-bent on undoing us better than Nixon tried to do, via narrow loopholes in our eighteenth-century-modeled Constitution.

The parallels of history repeating itself (Epilogue) in a very scary way are very apparent. For example, Mr. Trump assaults challengers to his lies with outrageous stories like Phyllis Schafly did, post, H2Ogate about the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) for American women!

Additionally, you’ll be able to draw the comparisons between the way both men hate the news media, act in ways that show they think they are above the law, to the similar street protests – excited in the Nixon case by the dismissal of Special Prosecutor, Archibald Cox – against their policies and policing; the corruption is the same. We only need another “Jilly Bean” (as one of her K Street colleagues nicknamed her) these days to save us similarly.

If you lived through the Nixon-Watergate scandal years, you already know that “law and order” really translates to a code that suggests police mistreat and incarcerate anybody except angry Caucasian-American men in-general. There are so many names which were the backdrop of my undergraduate university years in this book, like Ehrlichman, Haldeman, John Mitchel, Leon Jaworski and Judge Sirica, plus a neat photo section, that the read was like a reunion! Two other great names that she writes about are the first black American elected to Congress from Texas since emancipation, Congresswomen Barbara Jordan and and Brooklyn’s own, Elizabeth Holtzman!

“The Watergate Girl” could be required reading for a Political Science class these days for anyone under fifty years of age, who wants to understand how history is repeating itself in a very negative way due to the criminality of Donald Trump and his hand-picked gang of (often only “acting”) administration members. You will learn what the “Saturday Night Massacre” was all about. I came away reassured that we cannot, in good conscious, re-elect a man who has openly obstructed justice, soiled the office of the United States Presidency, cavorted with Russia (who would like take us over for many reasons), was impeached and continues to selfishly be a pall on the highest and most respected executive office in our country.

Although I borrowed this volume from my fantastic, new local public library, I plan to purchase a copy for my personal collection. I am not a television watcher, so can only take her word for her MSNBC accolades. Yet, anytime I read a book, cover-to-cover in seven days, it is worth five, compellingly fun, fascinating and readable stars in my “book”!

My summer, 2019 reading list includes this gem I found at the local public library:

Neil Armstrong was one strange dude. It was that quality that allowed him to be the first man on the moon.

Shoot for the Moon, The Space Race and The Extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11” [Little Brown, May 2019] is a magnificent chronology of the space race from when the USSR (Russians) were the only participants in 1957. It educates about the history, personalities, characters, successes and failures of America’s quest to put a man on the moon and of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) team leaders with familiar names to me from my boyhood like Chris Kraft, Gene Kranz and Walter Cronkite – because all of this was on television when there were only seven channels and during the beginning of color TV!

This tale is a reality check because it shows what humankind can achieve when inspired to pull together towards the same goal. It reminds also of a saying or lyric that goes, “even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars.”
I learned terms like “machine systems, CGM, LM training” and about the statuesque stack known as the Saturn V rocket which boosted our men towards the moon.

Its a story of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronaut families; of various contractors doing the unimaginable on a shoestring budget in today’s terms. Of luck and skill at problem solving which began at the end of World War II and how America recruited some former Nazi rocket builders (the movie “Operation Crossbow” comes to mind), led by Wernher Von Braun to help us catch and overtake the Soviets to win the race to the moon (a story in and of itself).

It will take you back to when mathematicians had to really think and solve problems, and the smallest computers were the size of a six-pack beer cooler; ingenious solutions to complex and urgent problems on-the-fly, literally!
The accurate descriptions amazed me like on page 371, when he describes meticulously how they were preparing for the EVA after Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin landed on the moon.

If you’re like me, you’ll feel like you’ve been to the moon and back after you’ve read Mr. Conrad’s final word of the Epilogue. The two multi-photo pages are informative (the Soviets attempts) and literally outta this world! Educators! This book should be required reading in every history, social studies and science classroom. It was such an exciting book, I hated to return it to the library! So, I’m gonna have to buy one for my personal atheneum.

The tome wraps with extensive notes, a bibliography such as I’ve not seen since my college days and a complete index. Five moons!

[May, 2019 while hassling a relocation]

Growing up through my mid-teens, my main sports heroes were Roberto Clemente, Roger Maris, Muhammad Ali and Joe Namath. The latter were two of the most controversial athletes of my comeuppance – that’s one of the main reasons I admired them! Back then, controversy was not sleazy or tabloid like the “reality tv” gossip is today – often catty. It was the beginning of the end of the “Ossie and Harriet era” (if you don’t know what that means, it is your first “homework” assignment after you finish reading this blog post).

Had you happened into my college dorm room, you would have seen this life-size poster, sans the text, on our wall next to my top bunk.

I wonder where I got it from and where is it now? Probably was a casualty of one of the floods that happened while I had stuff stored at my parent’s house back in the mid-1980s. Sad. Regardless, I discovered pro football on TV around the time that the NY Titans became the New York Jets; Pops was a Giant fan.

Consequentially, I smiled to myself with anticipation when I learned of Joe’s new book that came out in May, “All The Way, My Life In Four Quarters” [Little Brown and Company, May 2019] ! Having read a couple of other biography-style books about Joe “Willie” Namath, mainly penned by sports writers through the years, I was first impressed that he, himself wrote this one with a little help from his friends Sean Mortimer and Don Yaeger.

The backdrop (or “drop back to pass”) is Mr. Namath reviewing Super Bowl III from his present kitchen table as he scrutinizes his life simultaneously. He writes about his traditional Catholic family, Hungarian roots, upbringing in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania and his two main football coaching influences, his high school coach, Larry Bruno and the late Paul “Bear” Bryant of the University of Alabama (“Go TIDE!”,he would say here). While Joe relives the greatest win of his professional football career, he self-analyses his foibles, like drinking too many adult beverages (the Suzy Kolber interview) and how he’s now defeated those foes also. I’m impressed that he tells of still working out regularly on those famous knees, both of which were surgically replaced! Throughout the book he takes you inside the huddle, calling a quarterback sneak (I used to love when he did that!), back when quarterbacks were trusted to call their own plays, and the next moment, he describes events like why he came to wear his trademark white shoes and sport a Fu Manchu mustache for a while.

My favorite quote from the book is by his mother, and was uttered on the heels of one of Namath’s first experiences with racial segregation. The victim of a shopkeeper’s prejudice was his lifelong best friend, Linwood, and his mom explained, “There are some people in this world who are so sad and angry that they find ways (reasons) not to like other people.”

There is a neat little photo album section just about half-way into the tome, which includes his family, sports memories and candid, introspective moments. “First down!”

At 232 pages, “All The Way” is a solid, enjoyable, easy autobiographical read whether you are a Jet fan or not. The only thing missing is an index, so I could quickly refer back to the many highlights of his story (like describing my all-time favorite Jets defensive back, Johnny Sample, who talked smack in competition like Ali did). Joe is aging well, thanks be to St. Jude. I cannot wait to purchase a copy and hopefully have him autograph it for my personal book library. Five-out-of-five footballs is my rating. Way to go, Joe!

A steamy book by a new Author crossed my desk during the recently past holidays. “Brave New Woman (Brave New World)” by Lena Rose [Independent, October 31, 2018; 197 pages] is the kind of book I have never read, afraid it might plant sexy seeds in my mind, which I might not be able to grow when I put it down.

I am admiringly amused by the stalk of Indian corn on the cover as a phallic symbol – a hint of what’s to come (pun intended). Here, Rose combines historical facts with the theme of forbidden love, into an erotic thriller which hooked itself to my bedside table by the third chapter; I read a chapter nightly before I turned the light out to sleep during the past couple of weeks. I don’t want to hint at the story-line, lest I spoil the drama for you, but the twists and turns had me rooting for one of the main characters, who reminded me of the 1973 hit song by Cher, “Half-Breed”.

Its not easy to pen a good novel – or “novella” as she describes it. Lena employs all the right ingredients: the inciting incident, complications, crisis, climax and resolution in the graphically described erotic narrative. Her vividly accurate descriptions show the research she must have done into that period of American history.

The line spacing throughout the pages makes it an easier on the eyes read. Yet, missing is a publisher company name (she can make one up which suits her) on the lower back cover (with logo), and a title page preceding the Table of Contents. Also, maybe a dedication page would be cool there too!

Upon conclusion, she unabashedly asks for reviews on the same last page – before the reader can fully digest the final scenes. That gave me pause, seemed slightly dilettante (I guess because of eagerness for her first self-published book to do well) and therefore, I compliment this story with four-out-of-five fountain pens and recommend you add it to your library bookshelf.

**********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

If you’ve been here before,

*Pickkhitt: which bringz to mind…another classic record from my pre-radio DJ days, listening to “Musicradio77WABC, New York City” You know I always end a post with a song

Here we are, will it be a Happy New Year, 2019?!

When Author David Hunter found my ACX.com narrator profile and contacted me to read his book as an audio-book eighteen months ago, honestly, I thought it was another random scam attempt comin’ at me.

However, when I ginned-up my skeptical courage and contacted him via email, his enthusiasm for my chops (radio DJ talk for “voice”) was infectious! Suddenly I remembered the 1970s LIFE cereal commercial tag line, “Hey Mikey! He likes it!”

I invite you to join in our growing experience early in this clean year. Here I am, a (currently) former music radio personality, aka “Disc Jockey” with much left in my tank, trying to remain viable among changing media seas, in-concert with an Author who has written importantly, educationally and sociologically to help a specific ethnicity of mankind, exploring uncharted waters. You can listen to and purchase with a special discount promotion via itunes by right-clicking on this reference to open in a new tab or window:

https://www.audible.com/pd/I-Flunked-Sambo-University-10-InvisibleSchools-by-Which-African-Americans-Learn-to-Look-down-on-Their-Own-Genetic-Heritage-Audiobook/B07CJNHZGK

Also available on Amazom and Audible.com (an Amazon company), complete with link under the cover art to hear a sample of my reading. I couldn’t believe how patient and positive Mr. Hunter was throughout the months-long process of recording/producing each chapter and attending credits, because that kind of adulation is what I got used to in radio and which is suddenly sorely absent in the current corporate landscape of my earlier fun broadcasting on-mic career, sadly.

As for the book itself, I could not have written such a persuasively enlightening masterpiece that is so possibly controversially precise, because I avoid or am weary of the whole “race thing” in America. That is for others to cause. My eyes glaze-over when I hear and see the so-called current “President” of the United States of America waffle on violent race rallies and cavort/encourage with the radical fringe of insecure and mentally challenged anachronisms who attach a hue to the word “supremacists”. It is so passe`.
In my world, and as I hope in yours and most of today’s earthly humans, as the mid-1980s classic song by Jimmy Cliff says, “We All Are One”.

So now…to lighten things back up, for those of you who don’t know about the “Mikey” I mentioned above, I cannot resist plopping-in the video of that classic TV commercial of my youth below.

Enjoy and please travel with a good audio-book,(hopefully this one) soon!

I wanted to do this revu earlier , but got busy helping a new Author get her book out there. Please forgive the lapse as this book is definitely part of my 2018 “Summer of Reading”, like never in recent memory! (smile)
By the time I returned “Hitmen” to my local library, I was already curious about Kurson’s previous book, “Shadow Divers”, which was mentioned in every promotional note I read for his latest work. I know this book has been reviewed – it isn’t on the “new” list and it was published in 2004 – I just want to share it with you, a fan or one of the curious about my blog because it became part of my summer 2018 reading list.
At first, I dismissed it as another boring “fish story” about scuba diving, but boy was I wrong! This book is a great historical narrative of non-fiction which is SO to the point that I had to let you know about the story as this milestone summer wanes.

This volume has elements of suspense, drama, mystery, education and science.
Its about men who dive deepest sunken shipwrecks like the Andrea Doria for sport, coming across an object very near to New York harbor, which they identify as a German U-boat submarine, and their quest to precisely identify it because previous history had no record of such a vessel in those waters so close to our east coast!

As with “Hitmen”, Kurson lays the groundwork of the story, then biographies each character, alternating between perspective, action, more history and biographical perspective which includes their love lives. He teaches us while describing this unique saga of connecting personalities and wartime “dots” to identify this object at the bottom of the sea, not far from the New Jersey coast and New York City. He names the book during chapter 2 at the bottom of page 33.

“Shadow Divers” is a most amazing story that I thought I would never read. These men dive for “sport” so much deeper than Lloyd Brides ever did on one of my boyhood favorite television shows, “Sea Hunt”, which is the first place I ever heard about “the bends”, an affliction caused by the chemistry of nitrogen and oxygen in our blood and returning to the surface of the ocean too fast. You will read and experience the profound, dangerous excitement of the mix of air they breathe underwater and the discovery by these sportsmen to the point that it is so scary, that it catapults you to read-on!

One of the most moving parts of the book is his recounting of the father and son divers, the Rouses, who joined many other divers on Bill Nagel’s Seeker to attempt to recover artifacts and identify the “U-Who”.
“The Seeker rose and fell with nature’s onrushing tantrum, each explosion against the ocean threatening to catapult the divers overboard and crush Chrissy under the stern.” (pg. 218)

In my schooling, the Pacific theater of WWII was taught as a more important battleground than the Atlantic resistance. Yet, throughout this book and feeling the investigative bravery, persistence and fortitude of these divers, I learned that Hitler launched many of these demon submarines and was upon our biggest east coat city’s doorstep. Oh wow! This is true and these few men men saw it through! If a book can be describes as a “nail-biter”, then this is one of them – right until the chapter where Chatterton and Kohler’s rehearsals bear fruit. Even our recently departed and beloved United States Senator and war veteran, John McCain contributed to the back cover liner note endorsements of “Shadow Divers”!

Reading this book brought another one of my favorite underwater dive movies to mind, 1977’s “The Deep” with the great dance beat soundtrack theme by the late Donna Summer and sexy underwater underwear scene with Jacqueline Bisset. Whoa! That shipwreck was only in 70 feet of water, however. Let’s listen to that theme, which I appropriately apply (and it was a great dance music hit during the those days!) below.

If I were you, I would quickly add this book to my library. I actually read it twice and my rating is still five-out-of-five depth charges!

My 2018 “summer of reading” continues with, “Six Years In The Hanoi Hilton An Extraordinary Story Of Courage and Survival In Vietnam”.

Whether you are like me and grew up with the war in Vietnam and the Civil Rights movement as a backdrop to your life or not, you will surely want to check out this book by Amy Shivley Hawk, step-daughter of U.S. Air Force fighter pilot, James Richard Shivley (1942 – 2006), who was shot down over North Vietnam in 1967 – and suffered the consequences. She did a great job of transcribing her Dad’s impressions into this book and her chronological approach is fittingly perfect for learning moments and doesn’t make us wait very long, before we get to the meat of the story of being shot down and captured.

I remember news journalists like Dan Rather referring to many of our servicemen as “never accounted for”, like they wrote about his colleague, Captain Joe Karins, whose plane continued to fly along side of Jim’s after he ejected follwing being hit by enemy fire. [pg. 48]

This is a primer about the horrific prison of war camp conditions our soldiers endured during capture in the Vietnam War. If it wasn’t true history, you might think it is a movie like “Deer Hunter”. To all of my fellow Baby Boomers and high school (eleventh grade and up) or college school history teachers, please use this book as an opportunity to educate!

Have you ever wondered, as I have, what really happened behind the scenes in North Vietnam, when one of our men was captured? Were the rumored extreme tortures they endured really fact? This book will tell you, in graphic detail. Many of us are familiar with the fact that Arizona Senator and former presidential candidate, John McCain was a POW in North Vietnam, but this is a story about the other men who, heretofore were nameless and faceless along side of the great Senator. It is culled from family accounts, Captain Shivley’s diaries, CD, tapes and our unique American perspectives on a war that we fought with “one hand tied behind our back”, as my own WWII veteran Dad said often. And that was true until President Nixon launched the B52s on Hanoi when Henry Kissinger’s peace talks were not yielding the desired results from Hanoi.

This book is the stuff from which solving the MIA/POW movement was made of, a look inside of the infamous network of prison camps in Hanoi under Chairman Ho Chi Min. This is no “Hogan’s Heroes” comedy, for sure. I marveled at the description of how the prisoners learned to communicate via a tapping code, and simultaneously cringed at the tortures described which affirmed that many of my generation are lucky not to have been drafted back then, because we surely would not have survived such an ordeal of capture, if not killed by bullets.

It seems my World History classes taught that the Japanese tortured our captured WWII servicemen similarly; the Asians have special knack for inventing gruesome treatment of prisoners of war, as compared to “waterboarding” of our current “terrorism” era.
The book is a reminder that war is hell, to cherish your own basic freedoms and like James’ slogan says, “Don’t sweat the small stuff – and it’s all small stuff.” (pg. 172) There are many more positive things I could write about this book, but I will let you alone to read and glean them for yourself.

From the ‘Special Notes to POWs’ to the Acknowledgements chapter and how he became a US Prosecutor, my rating is a no-doubt, Five-out-of-five Bronze Spokane stars